Friday, May 27, 2011

NEW EXECUTIVE OFFICER APPOINTED TO THE BOARD


The Board for Professional Engineers, Land Surveyors, and Geologists has appointed Ric Moore, PLS as Executive Officer effective July 1, 2011.

Mr. Moore, PLS has been with the Board since 2007 as the Staff Land Surveyor and the Manager to the Examination Development and Administration Unit.

Congratulations Ric!!!

MWDOC eCurrents News Letter

MWDOC Newsletter
_________________________________

Message from the President
By Joan C. Finnegan, MWDOC Board President
May is Water Awareness Month. Water is something that, as a society, we take for granted. It is highly regulated, legislated, and fought over. Mark Twain said it best when he said, “Whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting.” And, in the West, this has been particularly true. Similarly, water on the international level is subject to conflict; but that conflict is often driven by scarcity and cleanliness. Did you know that one out of every six people in the world do not have access to clean, safe water? In fact, more people worldwide have cellular telephone service than have access to clean, safe water. Water Awareness is more than a month; it should be a part of our everyday life.
The Municipal Water District of Orange County (MWDOC) and the family of Orange County Water Agencies are committed to raising public awareness of water-related issues year round. MWDOC does this through a number of programs including its water education school program in partnership with the Discovery Science Center, its Water Policy Dinners, public outreach, and the annual Orange County Water Summit (Summit) in partnership with Orange County Water District and The Disneyland Resort. This year’s Summit was held on May 20th at Disney’s Grand Californian Hotel. Presentations have been posted at http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=xr8waecab&et=1105689018621&s=11443&e=001ZBYd0YJCKCIN2yvzM4HEY2nL2nQpKyWu6p3qvhxjiHcYa_r-9QOmLRJDKdFCUNt28uvmzmonIIWWXqgTVhjipjd2Lr9j3-pCgI0ASKaEqBKYz0e1Tyg4Uw==. Photos and video clips will soon follow.  At 7:30 a.m. on the first Friday of every month, policy makers and community leaders gather at MWDOC for the Water Advisory Committee of Orange County (WACO) which hosts guest speakers with expertise on water management, water resource development, legislation, regulation, and numerous other areas specializing in water. If you have not joined this engaging group in the past, please consider it. The next WACO meeting is on Friday, June 3rd, and will feature Byron Buck, Executive Director of the State & Federal Contractors Water Agency.
Improving our overall water use efficiency as a region is also part of building awareness. Information, tools, and rebates for improving residential, commercial and industrial water use efficiencies are available on MWDOC’s website, http://www.mwdoc.com/.


__________________________________

The Value of Water Brought to Focus at the O.C. Water Summit
By Gina DePinto, Principal Communications Specialist, Orange County Water District 
On Friday, May 20, more than 400 people attended the 4th annual Orange County Water Summit (Summit) and heard dynamic presentations and engaging discussions about the value of water, seismic risks to California’s water supplies, the need for new and improved infrastructure, and what it takes to build water infrastructure projects during today’s tough economic times.
Presented by the Orange County Water District, Municipal Water District of Orange County and the Disneyland Resort with Title Sponsor Siemens Water Technology Corp., the O.C. Water Summit brought experts from across the country together with Southern California business professionals, water industry stakeholders, elected officials, and community leaders to discuss ongoing state water issues.
The theme of this year’s Summit was “California’s Extreme Water Makeover.” Many people think of the “Big One” as an earthquake, but one of California’s most fragile fault lines is its main water delivery system that moves water from Northern California to parts of the Central Valley, the Bay area, and Southern California. One major earthquake or heavy storm could cause levees along the delivery system to break, allowing ocean water to rush into the Sacramento-San Joaquin River and contaminate water supplies, as well as potentially cutting off the delivery of water to many parts of California. For decades, blueprints to fix California’s lifeline have been drafted and debated. If and when a plan comes together that decision makers can agree on, how can California get it financed in the face of budget cuts, especially when water is a resource that is taken for granted and is highly undervalued?
Click here to read more about the OC Water Summit.

_______________________________

Legislation Proposing Statewide Water Fee "Parked" in Senate for Additional Work
By David J. Cordero, MWDOC Director of Government Affairs 
Proposed legislation that would create a statewide fee to fund water projects and programs that provide public benefits advanced to the Senate Appropriations Committee this month, where it will remain and become a “two-year bill” so that the author may work with stakeholders and others to address issues and concerns later this year.
The March issue of eCurrents introduced its readers to Senate Bill 34 by Senator Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto). The bill would establish a statewide fee to provide a sustainable revenue source to fund water projects and programs that provide state and regional “public benefits.” The proposed, but yet-to-be-determined, fee amounts would be assessed to urban retail and agricultural water suppliers on a per-acre-foot and per-irrigated acre basis respectively. The California Board of Equalization would be responsible for collecting the fee and depositing the revenue into a new California Water Resources Investment Fund. Half of the revenue would be deposited in a State Investment Account and the other half would be deposited into Regional Investment Accounts.
Funds disbursed from the State Investment Account would be under the jurisdiction of the California Water Commission. Direct expenditures and grant disbursements would be handled on an annual basis in consultation with various state agencies and include:
  • Operating expenses of the Delta Stewardship Council;
  • Grants and expenditures to implement the Delta Stewardship Council’s Delta Plan;
  • Projects of “statewide and interregional significance;”
  • Projects that reduce the impacts of mercury contamination in the Delta watershed;
  • Scientific studies and assessments; and
  • Debt service on general obligation bonds for projects and programs that provide statewide and interregional significance.
Click here to read more about the statewide water fee proposed in SB 34 (Simitian).

___________________________________


Winter Weather Improves Water Supply Conditions; Mandatory Water Reductions Lifted.
By Warren Greco, MWDOC Water Resource Analyst
After nearly two years of mandatory water supply reductions, full imported water deliveries have been restored to residents and businesses in Southern California. On April 13, 2011, the Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (Metropolitan) voted to end its Water Supply Allocation Plan for its 26 member agencies, which encompass 19 million people from Ventura to San Diego Counties. This step by Metropolitan made it possible for the Municipal Water District of Orange County (MWDOC) to end the supply allocation plan that it had adopted for its service area in July 2009.
Metropolitan adopted mandatory water use reductions two summers ago, as water supplies were heavily constrained following both a multi-year drought and pumping restrictions being imposed in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Bay-Delta) to protect endangered fish species. The action to lift the Water Supply Allocation Plan was made possible by storms this past winter, as well as the continued water use efficiency efforts by residents and businesses.
This season, many parts of California have experienced near record amounts of rainfall and snowpack, and imported water supplies have improved significantly from the previous three years. Locally, Orange County has received around 21 inches of rainfall compared to a historic average of around 13 inches. Overall precipitation in the northwestern slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, which supplies Southern California by way of the State Water Project, is at 144 percent of the normal. The Colorado River Basin, which supplies Southern California through the Colorado River Aqueduct, received its biggest snowpack in 14 years.
Click here to read more about water supply conditions.

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Mesa Consolidated Water District Breaks Ground on Colored Water Treatment Facility Improvements Project
By Stacy Taylor, Public Affairs Manager, Mesa Consolidated Water District
The Mesa Consolidated Water District (Mesa Water) Board of Directors inaugurated the start of construction for its Colored Water Treatment Facility improvements project with a ceremonial groundbreaking on April 19, 2011. A live webcam of the Colored Water Treatment Facility improvements project progress is online at http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?llr=xr8waecab&et=1105689018621&s=11443&e=001ZBYd0YJCKCLw7X0CDs8MfYEIgnD25e0GaZe_AVjO7jC8u4izDDhNB-6FjKwlSTmLS8UZZR-2VLUvQiI0bGOOn6cBbmk75VGzPQkNeLo3LD-kSUlK02Qrlw== under the public information menu.
“The Colored Water Treatment Facility produces delicious, soft, high-quality water,” said Mesa Water’s Board President, Fred R. Bockmiller, Jr., P.E., “and the Facility expansion will allow Mesa Water to achieve our goal of being able to produce 100 percent of our water from local sources.”
When completed in mid-2012, Mesa Water’s improved Colored Water Treatment Facility will provide the following benefits:
  • High-quality soft water;
  • 50 percent more water than the previous technology while using less energy;
  • Groundwater clean-up by keeping colored water from migrating into the clear water zone;
  • 100 percent local water reliability.
Mesa Water closed its Colored Water Treatment Facility for improvements on December 30, 2010. The contractor completed the demolition phase in mid-April 2011, and the expanded Facility is scheduled to return to service by mid-2012, just in time for peak summer demands.
Click here to read more about Mesa Water's Colored Water Treatment Facility.

________________________________

MWDOC Celebrates the Winners of the 2011 Poster and Slogan Contest
By Melissa Covarrubias, MWDOC Public Affairs Intern
The 2011 Poster and Slogan Contest sponsored by the Municipal Water District of Orange County (MWDOC), was a success once again. This year more than 800 entries were received from Orange County students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Thirty winners were selected in total – 15 for their poster entries and 15 for their slogan entries. The winning students were recognized at a special awards ceremony on Wednesday, May 25, at the Discovery Science Center in Santa Ana.
This year’s contest theme was “Low Flow is the Way to Go!” and all of the students showed their talent through their artwork and slogans.
The grand prize winner in the Kindergarten through Third Grade level was Iris Lee from Canyon View Elementary in Irvine. Iris received a pair of annual passes to Disneyland as her grand prize. The grand prize winner in the Fourth through Sixth Grade level was Deven Nagel (poster shown above left) from La Veta Elementary in Orange. Deven received an Apple iPad as his grand prize.
Click here to read more about the MWDOC Poster and Slogan Contest.

Thursday, May 26, 2011

The Capitol

More Open Space Added to North OC!

Opponents of the West Coyote Hills development who wanted more open space and parklands just got their wish! 

The Orange County Register’s Michael Mello reported today that the OCTA has purchased 300 acres in North Orange County to be preserved as open space. 

With an overall price tag of $2.96-million it works out to be just under $10,000 an acre making the Carbon Canyon open space is significantly cheaper than West Coyote Hills. 

Although this should end the calls for more parks and open space, the no-growth crowd will likely continue to pond their fists.  For this minority group, the 120-plus parks north of the 91-Freeway (http://gregsebourn.blogspot.com/2011/04/observers-love-affair-with-chevron-love.html) and the addition of 300 acres just aren’t enough. 

OC Register:
“Former owner Leo Hayashi had planned to build up to 300 homes on his acreage. However, the city said he could safely build less than half that number because of the area's steep slopes created by the grass-covered canyons and ridges.”

“The money comes from Measure M, a half-cent sales tax extended by Orange County voters in 2006 to fund transportation improvements. A portion of the funds would go toward making up for habitat damage from road improvements and other projects.
In Orange County, a 2005 estimate showed that as much as $243 million could be used over 30 years to restore or acquire wild habitat. About $40 million has been approved to buy property this year, Scheper said.”

To put the scope and magnitude of the Pacific Coast Homes development into perspective, the 760-home development could be worth as much as $350-million even after all of the public dedications are made. 

Free Speech or Trashy Signs

Is the placement and displaying of a political sign on private property protected by the 1st Amendment?  Not if it's in the City of San Juan Capistrano! 

The Orange County Register's Brittany Levine has an article on the issue HERE

The question has come up after a real estate developer,  Advanced Real Estate Services, received a notice of violation from the City for signs placed on private property.  The municipal code has restrictions on size and location of the signs but ARES spokesman Stephan Gregg told the Register that "We did receive a notice, but the signs are on private property and we have the constitutional right to free speech."  He explained that ARES is trying to work with the City to resolve the problem.  Though it is not immediately clear just how freedom of speech will be worked out with the municipality.

Political signs are an important part of our freedom of speech.  I cannot imagine a better example of a form of communication than those used on either side of an issue to proclaim a cause and show support one way or the other...so long as they are on private property with the consent of the owner or tenant.

The OC Register article gives some of the contentious background but at the heart of the sign issue is our inalienable right to speak freely through varied media including signs, even large billboards.

For the sake of San Clemente taxpayers, I hope City officials will drop the case and move on to more pressing civic matters.


________________________________________________
From the Orange County Register
ELECTION SIGN RULES
San Juan Capistrano has the following regulations for election signs on private property:
• No sign shall exceed 6 feet in height if free-standing, 6 square feet in area, and shall be located below the roof eaves if building-mounted.
• No sign shall be illuminated, revolve or otherwise function with mechanical parts or devices.
• No sign shall include flags, valances, pennants, lights or other similar attraction devices.
• Signs shall not be supported from any tree, utility pole or other utility installation on private or public property.
• Signs shall be posted no more than 30 days prior to the election date.
• Temporary signs shall be placed no less than 50 feet apart from identical or substantially similar temporary signs, and in no case shall more than one temporary sign per candidate or ballot-issue position be allowed per parcel.
• Signs shall be taken down and removed no later than five days following the election date.
Source: municipal code

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Crony Capitalism and Social Engineering: The Case against Tax-Increment Financing

Thanks to MORR for bringing this to my attention.  Go subscribe and get daily updates on issues regarding taxpayer funded redevelopment agencies.

Here is a brief excerpt from the Cato Institute and as the title alludes, taxpayer funded redevelopment is nothing more than "Crony Capitalism and Social Engineering".
_____________________________________________________________
Policy Analysis no. 676

Crony Capitalism and Social Engineering: The Case against Tax-Increment Financing

by Randal O'Toole

Tax-increment financing (TIF) is an increasingly popular way for cities to promote economic development. TIF works by allowing cities to use the property, sales, and other taxes collected from new developments — taxes that would otherwise go to schools, libraries, fire departments, and other urban services — to subsidize those same developments.
While cities often claim that TIF is "free money"... Read More Here

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Fullerton Residents Face Epic Struggle

The Orange County Register is reporting that 37% of all Fullerton homes listed are distressed. 

(From the OC Register)
Every two weeks, Orange County broker Steve Thomas publishes a report on the supply of local homes for sale. Here's what the latest report -- as of May 12 -- has to say about Fullerton …
  • 409 residences listed in brokers' MLS system with 133 new deals opening in the past 30 days.
  • By Thomas's math, this community has a "market time" (months it would take to sell all inventory at current pace of new escrows) of 3.08 months vs. 3.54 months found two weeks earlier vs. 2.39 months seen a year earlier. Countywide, latest market time was 3.68 months vs. 2.53 months a year ago.
  • Of the homes listed for sale in this community, 152 were either foreclosures being resold or short sales, where sellers owe more than the home's value. So distressed properties were 37.2% of supply of homes for sale vs. 33.9% countywide.
  • Homes for sale in Fullerton represent 3.7% of Orange County inventory -- and 4.0% of distressed homes for sale. New escrows here are 4.4% of all Orange County's new pending sales.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics is reporting that California's Unemployment for April is at 11.7% which does not take into consideration those whose benefits have expired or who have to have multiple minimum wage part-time jobs just to put food on the table and a roof over their head.

Gas prices are high, though they are not quite at their peak.

And of course there is the new water rate which will likely double water bills in less than 10 years.  Even with the rate increase the City will not have enough money to cover repairing and replacing the old water system.  The City plans to borrow million$ through bonds, a.k.a. the Taxpayers' Credit Card, to cover the shortfall. 

When will our leadership realize the need to replace our currently unsustainable governing philosophy with one that balances the critical needs of our community with the reality of our existing resources? 

Monday, May 23, 2011

Water Rate Increase Notice Heading to Your Mailbox

The notices will go out June 1 and will advise water rate payers that their water bills will increase as much as...6% per year every year for 5 years and then 3% every year for 5 more years.  But wait there's more! 

There will also be at least a 1.8% additional increase to cover that pesky "pass-through" cost that is a direct result of rate increases from OCWD, MWDOC, and MWD.

All of these are compounding interest rates with numerous variables that will likely increase.

Throughout the Water Rate Study process I struggled to get anyone to tell me what the actual cost is per meter.  I was told continually that the cost is really high and we just can't go there.  How expensive is it??  After hours and hours of meetings and studying I still don't have an answer. 

Here is what I do know. 

All of the "pass-through costs" related to the City's purchase of water are grossly underestimated.  I fear the actually "pass-through" cost will go up as much as 20% in just the next 2 to 3 years. 

The Water Rate Study showed a 3% increase in city employee costs could be expected despite the fact that the proposed budget shows a 3% in crease for CalPERS (pensions) for general (non-safety) employees and a 7.4% increase for safety employees.  The same proposed budget shows group benefits to increase 6.8% for non-safety employees and 7.8% for safety employees.  So, right from the start we have a glaring flaw that needs to be rectified.

Sexual harassment training is just one of the
Ethics Office accomplishments.  MWD Ethics
Office also created and provided Rumors and
Gossip training and ethical decision making
training for managers and employees.
 The Water Rate Study also shows the MWD pass-through as increasing by 6%.  However, MWD's proposed budget shows an increase of 23% for system operation as well as another 23% for construction costs.  The same MWD proposed budget shows MWD employees receiving a 12% increase in salaries and benefits and 18.4% increase in "labor costs".  The MWD budget has other fluff, such as the Ethics Office I wrote about HERE that costs rate payers $573,000 to review legislation and train employees on sexual harassment.

And the most egregious part of the Water Rate Study is the sacred franchise tax.  Most people pay their water bill believing that when they pay for that portion noted as "water" that they are in fact actually paying for the cost to purchase water and maintain the water system.  They are wrong.

First, according to the Water System Manager, we do not recover the actual cost of maintaining and delivering the water.  Hence the water rate study.


City profits from hidden tax!

Second, 10%-11% of your water bill (not your total utility bill) goes into the general fund.  The general fund is what pays for a major portion of our public safety and employee benefits such as pensions.  That 10%-11% does NOT go into the water fund.  So, when I asked the consultant from Municipal Financial Services how much the City marks up the water I was shocked that he said the City does not make any money on water sales.  Of course the City makes money, $2,486,000 is a nice chunk of change which that can only be labeled as profiteering or perhaps municipal greed. 

You see, franchise fees exist so that when a company, let's say AT&T, buries wires in the road, they have to pay a small fee to the City as rent.  That fee helps cover inspection and maintenance costs and is similar to a property tax.  That seems like a pretty rational way to deal with private entities using public right-of-way for utility systems but when the City charges its own water rate payers, it is adding insult to injury.


In the case of Fullerton's Water Rates a few things need to be made crystal clear to rate payers and to the City Council:
  • First, rate payers do not pay enough to cover the actual cost of maintaining and replacing the water system.
  • Second, our current water rates are based completely on consumption which is dependent on users consuming more water in order to maintain the system.  In fact, the more you conserve water, the more the City of Fullerton must raise water rates.  That's a stupid way of addressing our infrastructure.  No matter how much water you use or don't use there is a specific cost to make it available to you.  The water bill should have 2 segments: one for the fixed cost to have water available and a second segment that reflects the exact cost for water consumed.  That would be the most transparent way to address this.
  • Third, the City Council must abolish the franchise tax.  I realize that it will cause a $2.5-million shortfall in the general fund but keeping the tax in place is abusive and wasteful governance.  The City Council and City Manager's Office must be reminded that they, like the rest of us, must live within our means.  That means its time to drop the $50,000 allocation for membership in the League of Cities and Southern California Association of Governments and cut out the $50,000 allocated in the Public Works Department's Capitol Improvement Program to replace window coverings at Basque Yard (see page N-10 of proposed CIP).
At a time when 1 out of 4 of your friends, family, and neighbors are out of work, we need to remind our elected representatives of their fiduciary responsibility to voters and taxpayers. 
No comment.
Your last chance to speak up is July 19 at the City Council meeting and public hearing.

Greg Sebourn

Orange County Bail Bonds

The Beauty of a Storm

The Beauty of a Storm
Orange County, Ca.

My Grandma - A Eulogy

LET'S TALK ABOUT 1914 FOR A MOMENT.



FOR STARTERS, GRANDMA WAS BORN TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1914 IN HER FAMILY'S ATWOOD RANCH HOUSE.



IT IS WORTH NOTING THOSE ALSO BORN IN 1914:

JACK LALANNE

JOE DIMAGGIO

DANNY THOMAS



AND WHO DIED IN 1914:

JOHN MUIR, THE FAMOUS NATURALIST FOR WHICH NUMEROUS ROADS, PARKS, HOTELS, AND NATURE RESERVES ARE NAMED.



IT IS ALSO WORTH NOTING THAT IN 1914 WOODROW WILSON SIGNS MOTHER'S DAY PROCLAMATION AND BABE RUTH MAKES HIS MAJOR LEAGUE DEBUT WITH THE RED SOX. MOTHER'S DAY AND BASEBALL- TWO OF MY FAVORITES!! (PERHAPS HER NICKNAME "BABE" CAME FROM BABE RUTH???)



GRANDMA WAS BORN INTO A PERIOD OF TIME FILLED WITH TURMOIL. IN JUNE OF 1914 ARCHDUKE FRANZS FERDINAND WAS ASSASSINATED. WITHIN ONE MONTH WORLD WAR I RAGED ACROSS EUROPE. TWO DAYS AFTER HER BIRTH HOWEVER, GERMAN AND BRITISH TROOPS INTERRUPTED WWI TO CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS. (PERHAPS THEY PAUSE KNOWING THAT A GREAT WOMAN WAS BORNE) WORLD WAR I CONTINUED UNTIL THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES IN 1919.



ALTHOUGH SHE WAS ONLY 5 YEARS OLD, SHE SAW THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS CREATED AND THE 19TH AMENDMENT WAS APPROVED BY THE U.S. CONGRESS GUARANTEEING THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN TO VOTE.



SHE LIVED THROUGH MANY NOTABLE EVENTS. LIKE THE 1933 LONG BEACH EARTHQUAKE OR WHEN ATWOOD FLOODED ALONG WITH MOST OF ORANGE COUNTY IN 1938 AND THE FLOOD-WATERS CLAIMED MORE THAN 50 PEOPLE, 43 OF WHICH WERE FROM ATWOOD! ALL OF THIS DURING A TIME THAT WE READ ABOUT IN SCHOOL AND KNOWN AS "THE GREAT DEPRESSION". SOMEWHERE IN ALL OF THAT SHE FOUND THE LOVE OF HER LIFE, GRANDPA LEO, GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL, GOT MARRIED, AND HAD KIDS!



THEN THERE WAS WORLD WAR II. FROM PEARL HARBOR TO HIROSHIMA, GRANDMA WAS RAISING MY UNCLE BOB AND MOM ARLINE. WITH AIR-RAID SIRENS AND BLACKOUTS SHE WAS A WIFE AND MOTHER. WHAT A TIME TO RAISE CHILDREN! I BET GRANDMA'S PARENTS WERE ABEL TO TELL HER A THING OR TWO ABOUT RAISING KIDS IN WARTIME.



GRANDMA WAS THERE WHEN THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA HELD THEIR 3RD ANNUAL NATIONAL JAMBOREE IN 1953. SHE SAW AIRBASES OPEN IN '42 AND CLOSE IN '99. SHE WATCHED WALTER KNOTT START UP HIS BERRY FARM AND WALT DISNEY TURN ORANGE GROVES AND STRAWBERRY PATCHES INTO DISNEYLAND!



SHE SAW THE HORSE AND CARRIAGE FADE AWAY INTO HISTORY AND SPACE TRAVEL EXPLODE BEFORE HER WITH THE FIRST LUNAR LANDING. JUST IMAGINE HOW MUCH TECHNOLOGY HAS CHANGED OVER THE LAST 100 YEARS. FROM TUBE RECTIFIERS TO SUPERCONDUCTORS; FROM TRANS-ATLANTIC TELEGRAPH CABLES TO SATELLITE TV.



SHE SAW MORE IN HER 93 YEARS THAN MOST OF US WILL EVER READ ABOUT, LET ALONE LIVE THROUGH!



OF THOSE 93 YEARS IT IS MY HONOR TO HAVE BEEN HER GRANDSON FOR 35 OF THEM. SHE WAS MY MOTHER WHEN MOM HAD TO WORK. SHE WIPED MY NOSE AND PUT FOOD IN MY MOUTH. SHE LET ME PLAY WITH GRANDPA EVEN THOUGH SHE NEEDED HIM TO TAKE HER TO THE STORE. SHE WAS MY GRANDMA AND I WILL MISS HER IMMENSELY.



JUST LOOK AROUND THIS ROOM; SHE DID THIS. SHE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR BRINGING SO MANY GOOD PEOPLE INTO THIS WORLD AND TOGETHER TODAY. THIS IS HER LEGACY.



A Dedication To My Loving Wife, Stacey. Thank you for all you do for me!

Brad Paisley - I Thought I Loved You Then


I remember trying not to stare the night that I first met you
You had me mesmerized
3 weeks later in the front porch light taking 45 min to kiss you goodnight
I hadn’t told you yet but I thought I loved you then

Chorus
Now you’re my whole life now you’re my whole world
I just can’t believe the way I feel about you girl
Like a river meets the sea
Stronger than it’s ever been
We’ve come so far since that day
And I thought I loved you then.

I remember taking you back to right where I first met you
You were so surprised
There were people around
But I didn’t care I got down on one knee right there
And once again I thought I loved you then

Chorus
Now you’re my whole life now you’re my whole world
I just can’t believe the way I feel about you girl
Like a river meets the sea
Stronger than it’s ever been
We’ve come so far since that day
And I thought I loved you then.

I can just see you with a baby on the way
I can just see you when your hair is turning gray
What I can’t see is how I’m ever gonna love you more
But I’ve said that before.

Now you’re my whole life now you’re my whole world
I just can’t believe the way I feel about you girl
Well look back some day at this moment that we’re in
And I'll look at you and say I thought I loved you then
And I thought I loved you then...

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